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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the presidencies of bill clinton and george w. bush. dan balz of "the washington post" is author of a narrative of the 2008 campaign. and michael duffy of "time magazine" is author of a book about the world's most exclusive fraternity. the name of that book is "the presidents club." michael duffy as these presidents go from being campaigners to being presidents, how are they transformed? >> you know we asked a couple of the presidents who are still alive what they remember the big surprise or the big shock being when they finally stepped from being candidate into the oval office. and they say three things. one is the speed of the decisions come much faster. and unpredictably. they can't control the agenda. the second is, they're all hard. there are no easy ones and they all are fairly outspoken about just how difficult the choices are. basically there are downsides everywhere. and the third thing is that's a little more interesting. just because you make the decision doesn't mean anything happens. when ike took over from truman, truman said "poor ike, he'll think it's just like the army. do thi
wag going to launch his campaign. we knew this was going to be a big moment with bill clinton rolling out the big guns, if you like, and that was all canceled rather suddenly just as we woke up. so it was really strange knowing he was flying back to cope with a crisis while the rally went on and the normal things you hear at these rallies, the political campaign was going on. and the storm was mentioned by bill clinton but really not heavily. only in passing. and i think people are obviously talking about it to a certain extent. it's not in the front of their minds. what it does politically, conventional campaigning has ceased. it takes the two candidates off the media. i don't think people will be interested in them anyway. the normal style of campaigning has stopped. i don't mean politics has stopped. i think this is an important political moment. but the normal stuff of campaigning is over for a few days at least. >> bridgette kendall in cleveland, ohio. ohio only on the edge of hurricane sandy but right at the center of america's political storm. what do they think the impact on m
but called off an appearance there today with former president clinton. >> which means that, you know, that's going to be putting a little bit more burden on folks in the field because i'm not going to be able to campaign quite as much over the next couple of days. >> woodruff: still neither side could afford to let sandy derail all campaigning. so mr. clinton soldiers on in his absence. >> i say let's give the jobs to the man who has done the job so he can finish the job. >> woodruff: in his white house statement on the hurricane tod today, the president said politics would simply take a back seat for now. >> i am not worried at this point about the impact on the election. i'm worried about the impact on families. i'm worry about the impact on our first responders. i'm worried about the impact on our economy. and on transportation. the election will take care of itself next week. >> woodruff: in all, the hurricane forced cancellation of two dozen campaign events on both sides. it could spell trouble for early voting in a number of states. over the weekend, hundreds of people showed up at p
from hillary clinton. he has a mandate in his affordable care act. there's always some movement toward the center in governance, as well as a move toward the center toward the general election because of the nature of the two party system and the nature of divided governance. >> i'm not sure i would call what happened in the last couple of years a movement toward the center. i think of it as obama negotiating with himself with an intransigent right which used its power to hold the country hostage, rather than finding common ground. >> so, let's talk about what you did and didn't learn. you've watched the four debates now. do you have any idea of how governor romney would manage to cut income tax rates by 20% without increasing the deficit? or which tax deductions he would eliminate? or specifically, how he's going to create the 12 million jobs he's promised? or what barack obama's going to do in his second term? do you have any sense of that? >> well, in the case of the 12 million jobs, as we know, you don't have to do anything and you'll get 12 million jobs. any number of economists a
-up states around the country. former president bill clinton has hit the trail hard, appearing today in wisconsin and ohio on behalf of the president. >> but i am far more enthusiastic four years ago. >> woodruff: clinton was in minnesota earlier in the week, where the romney campaign recently announced a new ad buy. it's a place both sides had earlier assumed would belong to the democrats. the obama camp countered with a new ad featuring the endorsement of former secretary of state colin powell, ran it there and in nine other states. >> i think we ought to keep on the track that we're on. >> i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> woodruff: but the romney campaign also began airing a spanish-language ad in florida tying obama to latin american dictators hugo chavez and fidel castro. >> we are america's women. >> woodruff: and american future fund, a super pac supporting romney is running ads targeting women in michigan and pennsylvania, states considered safely democratic. as you can see on the "newshour's" vote 2012 map center" there are seven states currently considered by
backward on that. in the 1990s bill clinton raised exactly the high income tax rates that barack obama wants to return the rates to. and the 2000s which he did not mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, they actually added more than 1 million fewer private sector jobs if george bush's first term than president obama has under his first term so i really do not think that the basic economics or the history says that just going back to deregulation and high rate-- high income rate cuts is the thing that leads to growth. >> brown: and do you think professor -- >> two decades of strong growth, we saw two decade, 80ous and 90s with extraordinary growth. economists called it the great moderation long boom and that's because the stable policies are put in place. tax reform, if you like, of 1986. a bipartisan reform president reagan worked with democrats in congress, that is the kind of thing we nude to get the strong economy back. >> back to you professor goolsbee, just this question about -- >> i agree with that i think tax reform and a g
travel for three days, his surrogate was bill clinton who is about as good as a surrogate to get out there and get the base -- >> they did not stop trying to win votes in those states. gwen: this week we saw talk of an expanded map. pennsylvania, minnesota. is that true? >> it's not going to work. they can try it. gwen: republicans are saying we can win pennsylvania. >> do i believe it's tighter than it was earlier? gwen: yes. >> i do. but is it going to shrink fast enough? no. partly because when you think about those states, what do they have in common? the democratics of those states is much -- demographics of those states is much more towards romney. there has been very little work done to sort of laying the groundwork. >> it may be slightly more likely than jim mussina's plan a year ago to expand the map into arizona and georgia, but not a lot more. gwen: the other question i have for your guys, is so how late are we going to be up on tuesday? >> i think we'll know by midnight. >> you think? >> yep. >> wow, that is very good. i hope that is true. i don't feel like we've known at
, michelle obama, bill clinton. their campaigns have continued to run advertising. we've seen solicitations for contributions not to the obama campaign but to the red cross from that massive email list that barack obama has. the campaigns were up and running. they're still doing all the things they normally do. there's a little more sensitivity in the states that are affected by the hurricane but they can't really afford to pull out, to push the pause button. >> ifill: democrats have been saying that mitt romney during the republican primary debates may have said that he would actually cut back on fema which is not as unpopular as it once was. >> he said he wanted to move as much of that responsibility to the states and to private contributions as possible. so he's getting hit for that right now. what would mitt romney's fema look like? would it be as well funded as the current organization? there's about $7 billion in the bank right now. if mitt romney and republicans were in control in congress there is a question as to how they would handle disaster relief. generally speaking they've not
clinton called for a shakeup of the syrian opposition in its bid to oust president assad. she said it should include people who've been fighting on the front lines, not just activists who've lived outside of syria for decades. in china, a government think tank urged leadership to end the country's one-child policy. it recommends each family be allowed to have two children by 2015, and by 2020 all limits be dropped. the one-child policy was introduced in 1980 to help curb china's population growth. but it's been widely unpopular and led to imbalances, both between boys and girls and the nation's aging population and its labor force. letitia baldrige, the author and etiquette maven, has died at a nursing home outside washington. she had severe osteoarthritis and cardiac complications. baldrige served as first lady jacqueline kennedy's chief of staff, planning state dinners and social gatherings at the white house. later, "time" magazine hailed her the arbiter of "new american manners" for defining etiquette for the workplace. letitia baldrige was 86 years old. those are some of the d
. >> rose: not only that -- bill clinton is out there as the surrogate. >> and he has his campaign apparatus and advertising and the ground game. news coverage will be affected if this storm hadn't happened we would see wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting punishes to a presidential election in a television age we won't see as much of that, certainly through the weekend which means whichever candidate was going to benefit more from national coverage is going to lose compared to what it would have been like, i am not sure which candidate that was going to be. >> rose: exactly right. >> in the states which matter, particularly ohio which continues to be really the key to the election, there is going to be plenty of coverage, they were not that affected by the storm, with all due respect to the sympathies and empathy of the people of ohio i think they are going to be more focused on the presidential election, in the northeast there are a lot more focus on the storm and really only one or two battle ground states truly impacted by the storm, virginia and new hampshire, perhaps, and
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)